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Posts Tagged ‘Raw Food’

Small-Scale Farmering is Better, Says UN Report

June 1st, 2011 No comments

The “Agro-ecology and the right to food” confirmed what many in the traditional food movement already knew, traditional small-scale farming is better than large-scale factory farming.

My vision is to see a community farm in every town, neighborhood, or every few city blocks.  Modernity and civilization do not have to equal a separation of people from the natural world. People are happier and healthier around plants and fresh food, people and food have always existed together, children need to see their food growing and pick up fresh food. This is better for the health, mind, soul, and as this report shows this is better for the society, economy, and the environment.

Eco-Farming can double food production in 10 Years, says new UN report

GENEVA (8 March 2011) – Small-scale farmers can double food production within 10 years in critical regions by using ecological methods, a new UN report* shows. Based on an extensive review of the recent scientific literature, the study calls for a fundamental shift towards agroecology as a way to boost food production and improve the situation of the poorest.

“To feed 9 billion people in 2050, we urgently need to adopt the most efficient farming techniques available,” says Olivier De Schutter, UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food and author of the report. “Today’s scientific evidence demonstrates that agroecological methods outperform the use of chemical fertilizers in boosting food production where the hungry live — especially in unfavorable environments.”

Agroecology applies ecological science to the design of agricultural systems that can help put an end to food crises and address climate-change and poverty challenges. It enhances soils productivity and protects the crops against pests by relying on the natural environment such as beneficial trees, plants, animals and insects.

“To date, agroecological projects have shown an average crop yield increase of 80% in 57 developing countries, with an average increase of 116% for all African projects,” De Schutter says. “Recent projects conducted in 20 African countries demonstrated a doubling of crop yields over a period of 3-10 years.”

“Conventional farming relies on expensive inputs, fuels climate change and is not resilient to climatic shocks. It simply is not the best choice anymore today,” De Schutter stresses. “A large segment of the scientific community now acknowledges the positive impacts of agroecology on food production, poverty alleviation and climate change mitigation — and this is what is needed in a world of limited resources. Malawi, a country that launched a massive chemical fertilizer subsidy program a few years ago, is now implementing agroecology, benefiting more than 1.3 million of the poorest people, with maize yields increasing from 1 ton/ha to 2-3 tons/ha.”

The report also points out that projects in Indonesia, Vietnam and Bangladesh recorded up to 92 % reduction in insecticide use for rice, leading to important savings for poor farmers. “Knowledge came to replace pesticides and fertilizers. This was a winning bet, and comparable results abound in other African, Asian and Latin American countries,” the independent expert notes.

“The approach is also gaining ground in developed countries such as United States, Germany or France,” he said. “However, despite its impressive potential in realizing the right to food for all, agroecology is still insufficiently backed by ambitious public policies and consequently hardly goes beyond the experimental stage.”

The report identifies a dozen measures that States should implement to scale up agroecological practices.

“Agroecology is a knowledge-intensive approach. It requires public policies supporting agricultural research and participative extension services,” De Schutter says. “States and donors have a key role to play here. Private companies will not invest time and money in practices that cannot be rewarded by patents and which don’t open markets for chemical products or improved seeds.”

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The Best Probiotic Products

September 6th, 2010 No comments


Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that occur naturally in the human intestinal tract. Foods “cultured” with beneficial strains of probiotics such as yogurt and kefir have been used throughout history to improve overall health and vitality, and today, there are many studies reinforcing probiotics’ ability to balance and promote digestive health.

Probiotics also play an important role in modulating the immune system, 70% of which is located in the gut. The word “probiotic” means “for life”, “antibiotics” means “anti life”. I cannot emphasize enough the importance of healthy gut flora. The benefits of probiotics don’t end there, in fact many have reported the disappearance of acne, better skin texture, better hair, the halting of male pattern baldness, ending Candida, even Fibromyalgia, migraines were stopped, and allergies and inflammation reduced by having good gut flora.

“Why take probiotics daily?” you may be wondering. Well, our modern/civilized life has been detrimental to healthy gut flora. Refined sugars, adulterated grains and foods, chemicals, medication, fluoride and chlorine in drinking and cooking water, pasteurization of milk, amongst many other factors can kill off good gut flora and/or allow less-beneficial and sometimes harmful bacteria to take over. Further, many of us also do not eat fermented foods such as sauerkraut, sourdough, kimchi, kefir, etc..
I will address this question in future posts more thoroughly.

Many probiotic products exist, unfortunately, not all probiotics are equal, here I will list the best probiotic products, based on my research/opinion.

A general rule, for the greatest percentage of active (live) cultures is to buy probiotics that require refrigeration. However, this is not always the case. Also, remember, more strains doesn’t mean “better”. Some of the best probiotics have 8, 9 or even 4 strains.

I’ve looked around for the best probiotic products that have the best strains, this is what I came up with:

Note: My top 4 are interchangeable. Try one for a month, if you do not see results try another from the top 4. One of these will likely work for you. If not, you can try the other good ones listed below or scroll all the way down to read about using single-strain probiotics (some people react differently to different strains).

Here are the best:

1- Dr.Ohhira’s Probiotics 12 Plus
Dr. Ohhira invested years of testing on subjects and came up with a non-refrigerated probiotic supplement line.

Renowned microbiologists, lichiroh Ohhira, Ph.D., and scientists from Okayama University combined ancient Japanese fermentation skills with modern technology to create this unique beneficial product.

This one has twelve (12) strains of lactic acid bacteria, including powerful proprietary TH10, are used in a complex 3-year fermentation process. The nutrient rich cultures medium (an optimum natural pre-biotic) composed of vegetables, fruits, mushrooms and seaweeds is encapsulated along with the live lactic acid bacteria. The probiotic system also includes organic acids naturally produced by fermentation. These important substances create the proper GI environment in which all the body’s unique blend of hundreds of strains of friendly bacteria can flourish.

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