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Allopathic Nutrition vs. Metabolic Nutrition

October 26th, 2010 No comments

Here’s a document I wanted to share, it’s titled Allopathic Nutrition vs. Metabolic Nutrition (by Harold J. Kristal, article from the Townsend Report) discussed metabolic typing, blood pH, and explains what allopathic nutrition is.

Quote:

Most nutritionists today practice allopathic nutrition. I will describe a few examples. Calcium is usually prescribed to individuals with osteoporosis. Niacin is often prescribed for high cholesterol or poor circulation. Vitamin B-6 is frequently prescribed for circulatory disorders. In each case, a nutrient is utilized as a “universal” treatment for a given condition. These various supplements are prescribed to treat the disorders often with total disregard for the unique qualities that make up each individual’s metabolism.

This is an allopathic approach to nutrition. What is so confusing and confounding about nutrition today is that many people are helped by these protocols and many are not helped. Some, perhaps, are made worse. Why is this? Today I begin to understand why. The late Dr. Roger J. Williams, noted biochemist from the University of Texas and discoverer of pantothenic acid, stated that we are all biochemically unique. I now understand that these biochemical differences define an individual’s Metabolic Type. My experience has lead me to believe that it is the difference between Metabolic Types that is responsible for the actuality that, when it comes to nutrition, what makes one person better can actually make someone else with the same condition worse.
Understanding the following premises and facts offers a simplistic basis for this idea:

1. Ideal venous blood pH reflects the biochemical balance and metabolic efficiency in the fundamental homeostatic control mechanisms. The ideal venous pH is 7.46. Below this figure is acid, above this figure is alkaline. If one’s blood pH were to be in the proximity of ideal, then optimum absorption and utilization of micro and macro-nutrients will take place. The further one’s pH deviates from the ideal, the less efficient will be the absorption and utilization of these nutrients. This is when allergies, fatigue, digestive disorders, and a multitude of other disease conditions can occur.
2. Metabolism can be defined as the total life-supporting chemical and electrical reactions that take place in a cell or organism. The rate of oxidation and the affect of the autonomic nervous system are, I believe, two fundamental homeostatic control mechanisms that define Metabolic Types.
3. The Oxidative types relate to the oxidation rate-the speed at which the intracellular conversion of nutrients to energy occurs. The three classifications derived from the oxidation rate are the Fast Oxidizers (acid blood pH), Slow Oxidizers (alkaline blood pH), and mixed oxidizers.
4. The Autonomic types relate to the two divisions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), the master regulator of metabolism. The three classifications derived from the ANS are the Sympathetic, Parasympathetic, and the Balanced types.
5. Most individuals are dominant in one of five metabolic categories:
a) Fast Oxidizer
b) Slow Oxidizer
c) Balanced (Autonomic)/Mixed (Oxidative)
d) Sympathetic and
e) Parasympathetic.

Keep in mind that acid or alkaline blood pH can be due to either the influence of the oxidative system OR the autonomic system. The significant difference between these two systems is that most foods and most nutrients that acidify the Oxidative types actually alkalize the autonomic types, and foods and nutrients that alkalize the oxidative types acidify the Autonomic types!

This phenomenon is scientifically and factually proven. It is not theory, but fact. It was first observed by W.L. Wolcott of Healthexcel in 1983 and formulated into his principle called The Dominance Factor.1 This essentially states that the effect of any food or nutrient on biochemistry is not due to an inherent quality of that substance, but rather to the Dominant fundamental control system, e.g., Autonomic or Oxidative, being affected in the person’s biochemistry. This explains why a given nutrient can have different effects in different people. This also explains why what works for one person with a given condition may not work for another person with the same condition.

Because any nutrient can be acidifying or alkalizing, stimulatory or inhibitory, depending upon one’s Metabolic Type, when health practitioners use nutrition to address disease states in humans without taking into consideration their Metabolic Type, it is an allopathic approach. The success or failure of the treatment is hit-or-miss, a matter of chance and not predictability.

Download this document using this link http://www.seekingwholeness.com/wp-content/uploaded-files/2010/10/Allopathic-Nutrition-vs-Metabolic-Nutrition.pdf

Note: This article was posted here for “preservation” and archival reasons, sometimes you come across information online that you want to make sure others read now and in the future, but the internet world is ever-changing (for whatever reason, something maybe available today and gone tomorrow) thus I sometimes re-post articles like the one here for preservation, I do my best to make it clear that I do not take credit for these articles. I also urge you to visit the website of the author and research the author more to find other materials that she/he has written.

Why Saturated Fat is Good for You

October 24th, 2010 No comments


WHY SATURATED FAT IS GOOD FOR YOU

Although we don’t normally consider saturated fat as an essential nutrient, it is just as essential to good health as the essential polyunsaturated fatty acids. We need saturated fat for proper digestive function, growth, and a host of other processes. In fact, saturated fat is an essential component of every single cell in our bodies. It is so important to proper function and good health that nature has incorporated saturated fat into almost all of the foods we eat both of animal and plant origin. Even the so-called polyunsaturated oils like safflower oil, corn oil, and even flaxseed oil contain saturated fat. The World Health Organization and even the American Heart Association recommends that we get saturated fat in our diet to maintain optimal health. This type of information is usually ignored because saturated fat is considered a health hoodlum lurking in our food just to cause problems, and the less we eat the better. But this is simply not true. Nature doesn’t put saturated fat in vegetables, mother’s milk, and other foods for kicks. It’s there for a reason.

The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO), two international committees, recommend a polyunsaturated to saturated fat ratio (P:S) of 0.6:1.0. Or almost twice as much saturated fat as polyunsaturated fat in the diet. The membrane of our cells preferentially chooses saturated and monounsaturated fat for incorporation into its structure. Only in a few specialized structures are the polyunsaturated fats preferentially selected over saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids.

Saturated fat has been tagged a dietary monster, sneaking into our foods to cause untold health problems. Isn’t it interesting that saturated fat has been a staple part of the human diet for thousands of years and yet only recently has it turned bad, or so they say. In reality, saturated fat isn’t as bad as it has been portrayed; most of this negative publicity is profit motivated.

Cholesterol and saturated fat have been tagged as the biggest dietary villains of all time. Scientists are now discovering that cholesterol is not as bad as it has been made out to be. It is, in fact, vital to good health. Cholesterol is so important to the basic operations of life that without it, every cell in our body would become dead masses of fat and protein. Cholesterol is found in all body tissues and comprises an integral part of the cell membrane. Nine-tenths of all the body’s cholesterol is located in the external and internal membranes of cells. It is essential in the production of nerve and brain tissue. It is used by the body to make bile acids necessary for digestion of fats and fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K). Our bodies transform cholesterol into a variety of important hormones such as estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, DHEA, cortisol, and others. Simply put, without cholesterol we would be dead.

As knowledge of dietary cholesterol has increased, its status as a troublemaker has fallen. As a result, more heat has been placed on saturated fat, which is now considered a much more serious problem. According to the cholesterol theory, coronary artery disease is caused by cholesterol buildup in arteries, so why is saturated fat condemned? Saturated fat is attacked because our bodies can turn it into cholesterol. We get more cholesterol from saturated fat than we do from the cholesterol in our food. But this native cholesterol, which is made by our liver, is the naterial used to build healthy cells and is not the “oxidized” or damaged cholesterol that finds its way inside artery walls. So eating saturated fat contributes little, if anything, to the development of atherosclerosis and heart disease. Since ordinary cholesterol is not a factor in the development of heart disease, saturated fat, likewise, is not the problem it is made out to be.

History has proven this fact. Our ancestors lived on a diet rich in grease, lard, and butter. Those were the only oils they ever used. It wasn’t until the 20th century that vegetable oils became widely available. Use of oils rich in saturated fat have declined over time while vegetable oils have skyrocketed. Along with the greater use of vegetable oil and the decreased use of saturated fat has come a plague of degenerative diseases that the world has never known before. To blame cholesterol and saturated fat for the heart disease, cancer, and other degenerative diseases does not fit the facts and is inconsistent with the historical record.

There have been many studies that demonstrate that saturated fat is not nearly as bad as it has been made out to be. If saturated fat consumption caused heart disease then eliminating it from the diet would prevent the illness. The Lancet reported a study of 2,000 men who went on a low saturated fat diet to see how that would affect cardiovascular health. The study found that those participants who went on diets low in saturated fat didn’t experience any reduction in heart attack death risk over a two year period. If eliminating saturated fat didn’t stop heart disease from developing, it is logical to assume there is another cause.

Researchers have shown in animal studies that saturated fatty acids actually help to prevent stroke rather than cause it. In particular, Dr. Yamori reported decreased stroke incidence among rats fed a high-fat, high cholesterol diet. In addition, Dr. Ikeda demonstrated a dcreased stroke risk among rats fed a diet high in milk fat.

Two ecological studies in the 1980s from Japan found correlations between increased fat intake and decreased death from ischemic stroke in humans. In another cohort study of Japanese men living in Hawaii, intake of both total fat and saturated fat was inversely associated with all stroke mortality, after adjustment for multiple risk factors. These studies were generally ignored because they were contrary to the prevailing belief that saturated fat promotes ischemic stroke rather than protects us from it.

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