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Posts Tagged ‘Native American’

I Saw a Hole in the Man, Deep Like a Hunger He Will Never Fill

November 24th, 2010 3 comments

man-hole

“And a Man sat alone, drenched deep in sadness. And all the animals drew near to him and said, “We do not like to see you so sad. Ask us for whatever you wish and you shall have it.” The Man said, “I want to have good sight.” The vulture replied, “You shall have mine.” The Man said, “I want to be strong.” The jaguar said, “You shall be strong like me.” Then the Man said, “I long to know the secrets of the earth.” The serpent replied, “I will show them to you.” And so it went with all the animals. And when the Man had all the gifts that they could give, he left. Then the owl said to the other animals, “Now the Man knows much, he’ll be able to do many things. Suddenly I am afraid.” The deer said, “The Man has all that he needs. Now his sadness will stop.” But the owl replied, “No. I saw a hole in the Man, deep like a hunger he will never fill. It is what makes him sad and what makes him want. He will go on taking and taking, until one day the World will say, ‘I am no more and I have nothing left to give.” Native American Wisdom

Comment:

I agree with this quote. However, I must say while many seem to have these gaping holes that they seek to fill (usually with food, habits or material items) some of us do not have the hole. The hole can be plugged, it can be filled. We are whole and complete as we are, we are divine and holy, all of us. Many do not know that. I wish everyone would have the insight and openness to see this on their journey, as this is my truth.

I suggest the following to help you fill that hole: Just Be, Meditate, Experiment with hypnosis, Spend time with nature, in nature, admire the beauty in nature, be alone, explore your own mind/body .. Reconnect with the spirit of nature, feel it, hear it, experience it, enjoy it! It is always there, just as the “answer to fill the hole” is, very close that many can’t see it. This answer is not in words, not in data, not even in seeing. It is so basic, emotional knowing in your gut, that many first need to slow down and reconnect with themselves before they can suddenly find this hole simply gone. The answer is always there, we just think it’s not because it is not in words or science, it is very personal and organic, so close. You just have to look inside of you, and be. When this hole is filled, then everything inside and outside will look alive, more colorful, more holy, you start to see things (everything) differently in some way.

In being, present, silent, alone, i nature, in the moment, you can see that you are whole,

now

.. breath

.

.

Thanks,

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On Peace

January 26th, 2010 No comments


Peace …comes within the souls of men when they realize their relationship, their oneness, with the Universe and all its powers, and when they realize that…the center of the Universe… is really everywhere, it is within each of us.

—Black Elk, Oglala Lakota, 1947

Elders Speak – Listen to Native American Prophecy

December 30th, 2009 No comments

Very valuable – must watch:

Winona LaDuke – Added to Seeking Wholeness’s “Best Of”

November 15th, 2009 No comments

winona_ladukeWinona LaDuke, is an Anishinaabeg (Ojibwe) enrolled member of the Mississippi Band of Anishinaabeg and is the mother of three children. Winona is the Program Director of Honor the Earth and Founding Director of White Earth Land Recovery Project.

Leading Honor the Earth she provides vision and leadership for the organization’s Regranting Program and its Strategic Initiatives.  In addition, she has worked for two decades on the land issues of the White Earth Reservation, including litigation, over land rights in the 1980′s.  In 1989, she received the Reebok Human Rights Award, with which in part she began the White Earth Land Recovery Project.

In 1994, Winona was nominated by Time Magazine as one of America’s fifty most promising leaders under forty years of age, and has also been awarded the Thomas Merton Award in 1996, the Ann Bancroft Award, Ms. Woman of the Year Award (with the Indigo Girls in 1997), the Global Green Award, and numerous other honors. A graduate of Harvard and Antioch Universities, she has written extensively on Native American and environmental issues.

Her books include: Last Standing Woman (fiction), All Our Relations (non-fiction), In the Sugarbush (Children’s), and The Winona LaDuke Reader.

To show respect to all of her work, I post this article about Winona LaDuke under the Best Of category.

For more information, visit: http://nativeharvest.com.

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires – Watch It For Free Now

January 18th, 2009 No comments

Watch the Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires documentary now online for free

Summary

For six-hundred years we have lived under the misconception that Columbus discovered America. What he did was stumble on a land already occupied by many people and many nations. In the center of that land were a people who call themselves Oyate: “the People”. This is their story, in their words. Original music composed and performed by Lakota artist, Kevin Locke.

Running time: 59 minutes (Watch Now Online)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires – Trailer

January 17th, 2009 No comments

Watch Trailer:

Watch the trailer for the documentary entitled “Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires” below.

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Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires – Resources

January 17th, 2009 No comments

Find the documentary “Oceti Sakowin:The People Of The Seven Council Fires” on PBS, Find pictures and listen to music:

http://www.aptv.org/schedule/nolaschedule.asp?NOLA1=OCET

The Lakota preserve many histories of their people in stories passed on from generation to generation. One such story tells of how the Lakota came to the plains, and how they came to arrange themselves into the Oceti Sakowin, the Seven Council Fires. The story tells of a long journey from a land by a large lake, where the Lakota fed on fish, heated by the warmth of the sun, and were warm and happy. According to this tale, a man appeared to the Lakota in a cloud that hung near the sea, and told them to travel northward. The Lakota obeyed, and began to travel north.

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The People of the Seven Council Fires – Documentary Summary pt4

January 17th, 2009 No comments

This is part 4 of the series of articles entitled “The People of the Seven Council Fires – Documentary Summary“. Find part one here, part two here, part three here.

This article is about Family and the new way of life the Oyate were forced into.

Relationships are very important to the Oyate. If you were an Oyate you can make new relatives, by adopting someone as a relative, as a mother, son, sister or brother.

Social structure

The social structure is one of an extended family.

The men assume the role of the protector, provider and leadership.

Women

Women maintain the household. Women are viewed as nurturers & educators.

Women educate the children until a certain age, when boys go with men mentors and women stay under the womens’ mentorship

Grandmothers are usually the educators of the young

Women owned the house and tipi

Ethnic Cleansing

The Lakota were men of peace, lived in balance with creation and addressed all creation as relatives, they were relatives with the white buffalo

The Lakota was the last of tribes to resit the US military, odds and numbers were against them and eventually they worse faced with a new way of life.

Treaties were made and broken. Land was taken. People were forced into farming, and into boarding schools that were basically functioning in a Catholic school system. Further, families broken apart and separated, men and women and children separated.

Their roles were taken away. The women could no longer teach and nurture their children who were taken away from them; the men had no buffalo to hunt and mentoring to give.

The rationale for the boarding schools was, as Carlisle founder Richard Henry Pratt often said, to “kill the Indian and save the man.” But the actual reason was economic: By taking away the children, the U.S. government was able to take away and maintain control of the Indian land base.

Alcohol & drugs came into their lives when reservations started; the buffalo was replaced by rations as part of a government ration system.

The Oral tradition ended; now Cathlic nuns taught children and provided the children protection, someone else was providing for the children.

It was against the law to be Lakota from 1880 to 1978 !!!

In the 1950′s 100% of the Lakota denied their indiannes and they did not speak in Lakota.

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The People of the Seven Council Fires – Documentary Summary pt3

January 16th, 2009 No comments
28 support poles around the sundance arbor

28 support poles around the sundance arbor

This is part 3 of the series of articles entitled “The People of the Seven Council Fires – Documentary Summary“. Find part one here, part two here.

This article talks about numbers. Numbers are sacred to the Oyate people.

The Number Seven

The numbers 7 and 4 are sacred thus are integrated in everything.

Seven (7) is used for social units or the structures of things
Four (4) is used in ritual
4 multiplied by 7 = 28.

The number twenty Eight (28) combines both ritual and social. The Oyate have 28 sundance lodges (or 28 support poles around the sundance arbor – sorry I’m a little confused about this particular one), 28 divisions in circle, and the months have 28 days (since they are lunar months)

The number 7 can be broken into 1, 2 and 4 , giving each of these numbers some significance.

Stay tuned for part 4 which will talk about Family

This series of articles are categories under “Religion / Atheism” and are tagged with “Ancient”.

End of part 3

Note: These articles were written in recognition and in high respect to those who inhabited these lands before me, to those who coexisted and protect the land, and to their spirituality, culture and legacy. My small contribution to bringing the truth out about what happened to the original inhabitants of North America.

The People of the Seven Council Fires – Documentary Summary pt1

December 1st, 2008 1 comment

I watched a documentary last Sunday that captivated my full attention and educated me while solidifying the respect I had for the Native Americans and their ancient ways of life. The documentary was titled “Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires”. The documentary presented information that I found very valuable I had to reach for my laptop and start taking notes. Here, I will summarize the documentary in my own words from my notes.

Calf Woman and the Sacred Pipe

This documentary discussed the history and lifestyle of the Oyate. The Oyate were the people who inhabited the upper Midwest region. The word Oyate translates to “the people”. Those were “the people” of the land before Columbus stumbled upon what is known now as America.

We all know that Columbus did not discover America. So, what about the people who lived here, were they really the lawless savages the Europeans painted them as? Simply, the answer is absolutely not.

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