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Posts Tagged ‘Diet’

EarthWorms, Humans Best Allies – YouTube Playlist

January 6th, 2014 No comments

Learn about the importance of earth worms, here’s a compiled youtube play list

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IaeR7J39ydU&list=PLfcN1PUKhSMad9-wRtD5bic-iRDpMyOrq

 

A Modified Elimination Diet

November 24th, 2010 No comments


This is one version of a modified Elimination Diet that I like. It removes any possible allergen or inflammatory food, you most likely can tolerate most these but while on this diet the idea is to not eat anything that could remotely cause you inflammation. If some people had an inflammatory reaction then this food is listed in the Foods to Avoid column.

-::- Note: The below is posted here for archival and educational purposes -::-

Modified Elimination Diet

Foods to Include Foods to Avoid
Fruits Unsweetened fresh, frozen, water- packed, or canned; unsweetened fruit juices except orange Oranges
Vegetables All fresh raw, steamed, sautéed,

juiced, or roasted vegetables

Corn; creamed vegetables
Starch Rice, oats, millet, quinoa, amaranth,

teff, tapioca, buckwheat

Wheat, corn, barley, spelt, kamut, rye;

all gluten-containing products

Bread/Cereal Products made from rice, oat, buckwheat, millet, potato flour, tapioca, arrowroot, amaranth, quinoa Products made from wheat, spelt, kamut, rye, barley; all gluten- containing products
Legumes All beans, peas, and lentils unless

otherwise indicated

Soybeans†, tofu, tempeh, soybeans,

soy milk, other soy products

Nuts and Seeds Almonds, cashews, walnuts; sesame (tahini), sunflower, and pumpkin seeds; butters made from these nuts and seeds Peanuts, peanut butter
Fats Cold-expeller pressed olive, flax, canola, safflower, sunflower, sesame, walnut, pumpkin, or almond oils Margarine, butter, shortening, processed (hydrogenated) oils, mayonnaise, spreads
Beverages Filtered or distilled water, herbal tea, seltzer or mineral water Soda pop or soft drinks, alcoholic beverages, coffee, tea, other caffeinated beverages
Spices & Condiments All spices unless otherwise indicated. For example, use: cinnamon, cumin, dill, garlic, ginger, carob, oregano, parsley, rosemary, tarragon, thyme, turmeric, vinegar Chocolate††, ketchup, mustard, relish, chutney, soy sauce, barbeque sauce, other condiments
Sweeteners Brown rice syrup, fruit sweetener,

blackstrap molasses, stevia

White or brown refined sugar, honey, maple syrup, corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup, candy; desserts made with these sweeteners
†Note that soy is an ingredient in some of the recommended medical foods and supplement formulas. Therefore,those products are only recommended if your healthcare practitioner has determined you have no intolerance to soy.

††Note that chocolate is an ingredient in some of the recommended medical foods. Therefore, those products are only recommended if your healthcare practitioner has determined you have no intolerance to chocolate.

Last Updated on Thursday, 29 January 2009 03:22

:: The diet above has been posted here for archival and educational purposes only. PLEASE do me a favor and visit the author’s website, i.e. the ORIGINAL website where this diet was found, by following this link, and considering using their services and/or visiting their sponsors’ websites: http://www.ecopolitan.com/health-services/eco-healing/ ::

Candida Albicans Dietary Guide

November 23rd, 2010 No comments

-::- Note: The below is being posted here for archival and educational purposes -::-

Candida Albicans Dietary Guide

Food Permitted Foods Foods Not Permitted
Sweets Unpasteurized honey, unsulfurated black-strap molasses, raw sugar sorghum by themselves or used as sweeteners. NOTE: Use in moderation! Refined sugar, candy, chocolate.
Fruits Fresh fruits only: apples, pears, apricots, bananas, cherries, grapes, guava, currants, nectarines, papaya, peaches,

plums, quince, tangerines, avocados, ripe pineapple. NOTE: Fruits should be limited to a maximum of two per day.

Canned fruit, oranges, melons, dried or candied fruits.
Juices Only fresh juices. May be selected from list of vegetables permitted, including the following green leaves: chicory, endive, escarole lettuce, Swiss chard, and watercress. Canned juices, and juices with artificial coloring or sweetening.
Beverages Mineral water, herb tea, mint tea, papaya tea, fresh vegetable

juices.

Alcohol, coffee, tea, soft drinks containing preservatives.
Breads Rye, whole wheat, soya, bran, whole grain stone-ground breads. NOTE: Limit to a maximum of two slices per day. White bread, bleached flour

products.

Cereals Buckwheat, corn meal, cracked wheat, millet, oatmeal,

sesame, grits.

Refined, bleached flour, and sugar

coated cereals.

Oils Cold pressed oils, preferably flaxseed, safflower, canola or

soya lecithin spread.

Shortening, margarine, saturated oils and fats.
Nuts Fresh, raw nuts such as almonds, pecans, cashews, Brazil nuts, and walnuts (peanuts very occasionally). Roasted and salted nuts. No peanuts if patient has digestive or colon related problems.
Vegetables Raw or lightly cooked: artichokes, asparagus, carrots, cauliflower, celery, chives, corn, egg plant, endives, green leeks, green peas, green pepper, leeks, lentils, lima beans, potatoes, radishes, spinach, squash, tomatoes, wax beans, yams. Any vegetables listed under salads. NOTE: Washing vegetables in a 10% Clorox solution and rinsing well will reduce microbial growth. All canned vegetables.
Potatoes Baked, boiled, or mashed. May substitute brown rice or corn. French fried, chips, white rice.
Salads The following raw vegetables shredded or finely chopped, separated or mixed: broccoli, Brussels sprouts, carrots, cauliflower, celery, chicory, green pepper, lettuce, onions, radishes, Swiss chard, tomatoes, turnips, and watercress. Any other. No white or cider

vinegar.

Seasonings Chives, garlic, onion, parsley, laurel, marjoram, sage, thyme, savory, cumin, oregano, salt substitutes such as Co-salt or other potassium salt, sea salt, kelp salt, and herbs. Spices, pepper, paprika, sodium

salt. No white or cider vinegar.

Soups Vegetable soup. Barley, brown rice, or millet can be added. Canned and creamed soup, fat stock, consomme.

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Oral Cleanliness is Not the Best Known Means for the Control of Dental Caries – Weston Price

October 28th, 2010 No comments

Below is another very educational article written by Dr. Weston Price and commented on by Ramiel Nagel. This article is posted here for “preservation” and archival reasons, sometimes you come across information online that you want to make sure others read, but the internet world is ever-changing, something maybe available today and gone tomorrow, thus I sometimes re-post articles like the one below here but take NO CREDIT for any of them.

Here is the article:

Weston Price – That a Clean Tooth Does Not Decay and that Mouth Cleanliness Affords the Best Known Protection Against Dental Caries.

Dental Cosmos Page 871 1934: by Weston A Price, DDS:

Oral cleanliness is not the best known means for the control of dental caries because:

(I) Since primitive man has had high immunity to dental caries he becomes our control in the great experiment of civilizations.

It is essential there fore, that we study the controlling factors of his environment, of which he is the product, and use these as our yardstick for studying modern civilization.

For this I have studied remnants of several primitive racial stocks where their physical isolation had sheltered them from the influences of our modern civilization, and by studying them and their foods and their methods of living, certain underlying factors are found to be common to all these primitive groups, even though they were living in different countries and on very different foods. This permits us to critically analyze modern civilizations at their points of contact with the primitives and, by studying them and their problems with the standards of immune primitives, not the factors which are contributing to dental caries.

By studying the children in four isolated valley in Switzerland; Loetschental, Visperterminen, Grachen, and Ayer in the Swiss Alps, I found the incidence of dental caries to be only 4.6 percent of the teeth studied. Here oral prophylaxis and modern equipment for practicing it were largely unknown. At St. Moritz, however, at approximately the same altitude, which is highly modernized community with excellent training in oral prophylaxis, the incidence of caries was 29.8 per cent of teeth studied.

At Vissoie and Zinal, which were partially modernized, 22 percent of the teeth examined had been attacked by dental caries. At Herisau, in the plains country of Switzerland, also a highly modernized community with splendid instruction and equipment for mouth cleanliness, the incidence of cares was 24.7 per cent of the teeth examined.

Similar studies were made in the Outer Hebrides off the west coast of Scotland and revealed that in the isolated districts of the Isles of Lewis and Harris, only 1.2 percent of the teeth examined has been attacked by dental caries. Oral prophylaxes was almost unknown. In the ports and modernized sections the incidence of dental caries was found to be 30 per cent of teeth examined.

The natural foods available for these two primitive groups wee very different in origin, but similar in chemical content, as will presently be shown.

Similarly, studies were made of remnants of the primitive Eskimos and Indians of Alaska and northern Canada and of those individuals of these groups who are at the point of contact with modern civilization.

The Eskimos of western and northern Alaska were reached by airplane and for several groups who had been but little influenced by modern civilization, hence living entirely on native foods, the per cent of teeth found to have been attacked by dental caries was 0.09, that is, only two teeth out of 2138 in seventy-two individuals. No effort apparently had ever been made at oral prophylaxis in these groups.

At the point of contact with modern civilization, where a government supply boat comes once a year to provision a government state, the incidence of caries among the local Eskimos increased to 13 per cent of the teeth, or 394 teeth out of 2254 in eighty-one individuals. At this point oral prophylaxis was being taught and practiced and, in spite of it, the increase in dental caries was 144-fold. The controlling factors in producing these changes will presently be shown to be nutritional. The natural food of the primitive Eskimos was almost entirely the animal life of the sea.

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Allopathic Nutrition vs. Metabolic Nutrition

October 26th, 2010 No comments

Here’s a document I wanted to share, it’s titled Allopathic Nutrition vs. Metabolic Nutrition (by Harold J. Kristal, article from the Townsend Report) discussed metabolic typing, blood pH, and explains what allopathic nutrition is.

Quote:

Most nutritionists today practice allopathic nutrition. I will describe a few examples. Calcium is usually prescribed to individuals with osteoporosis. Niacin is often prescribed for high cholesterol or poor circulation. Vitamin B-6 is frequently prescribed for circulatory disorders. In each case, a nutrient is utilized as a “universal” treatment for a given condition. These various supplements are prescribed to treat the disorders often with total disregard for the unique qualities that make up each individual’s metabolism.

This is an allopathic approach to nutrition. What is so confusing and confounding about nutrition today is that many people are helped by these protocols and many are not helped. Some, perhaps, are made worse. Why is this? Today I begin to understand why. The late Dr. Roger J. Williams, noted biochemist from the University of Texas and discoverer of pantothenic acid, stated that we are all biochemically unique. I now understand that these biochemical differences define an individual’s Metabolic Type. My experience has lead me to believe that it is the difference between Metabolic Types that is responsible for the actuality that, when it comes to nutrition, what makes one person better can actually make someone else with the same condition worse.
Understanding the following premises and facts offers a simplistic basis for this idea:

1. Ideal venous blood pH reflects the biochemical balance and metabolic efficiency in the fundamental homeostatic control mechanisms. The ideal venous pH is 7.46. Below this figure is acid, above this figure is alkaline. If one’s blood pH were to be in the proximity of ideal, then optimum absorption and utilization of micro and macro-nutrients will take place. The further one’s pH deviates from the ideal, the less efficient will be the absorption and utilization of these nutrients. This is when allergies, fatigue, digestive disorders, and a multitude of other disease conditions can occur.
2. Metabolism can be defined as the total life-supporting chemical and electrical reactions that take place in a cell or organism. The rate of oxidation and the affect of the autonomic nervous system are, I believe, two fundamental homeostatic control mechanisms that define Metabolic Types.
3. The Oxidative types relate to the oxidation rate-the speed at which the intracellular conversion of nutrients to energy occurs. The three classifications derived from the oxidation rate are the Fast Oxidizers (acid blood pH), Slow Oxidizers (alkaline blood pH), and mixed oxidizers.
4. The Autonomic types relate to the two divisions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), the master regulator of metabolism. The three classifications derived from the ANS are the Sympathetic, Parasympathetic, and the Balanced types.
5. Most individuals are dominant in one of five metabolic categories:
a) Fast Oxidizer
b) Slow Oxidizer
c) Balanced (Autonomic)/Mixed (Oxidative)
d) Sympathetic and
e) Parasympathetic.

Keep in mind that acid or alkaline blood pH can be due to either the influence of the oxidative system OR the autonomic system. The significant difference between these two systems is that most foods and most nutrients that acidify the Oxidative types actually alkalize the autonomic types, and foods and nutrients that alkalize the oxidative types acidify the Autonomic types!

This phenomenon is scientifically and factually proven. It is not theory, but fact. It was first observed by W.L. Wolcott of Healthexcel in 1983 and formulated into his principle called The Dominance Factor.1 This essentially states that the effect of any food or nutrient on biochemistry is not due to an inherent quality of that substance, but rather to the Dominant fundamental control system, e.g., Autonomic or Oxidative, being affected in the person’s biochemistry. This explains why a given nutrient can have different effects in different people. This also explains why what works for one person with a given condition may not work for another person with the same condition.

Because any nutrient can be acidifying or alkalizing, stimulatory or inhibitory, depending upon one’s Metabolic Type, when health practitioners use nutrition to address disease states in humans without taking into consideration their Metabolic Type, it is an allopathic approach. The success or failure of the treatment is hit-or-miss, a matter of chance and not predictability.

Download this document using this link http://www.seekingwholeness.com/wp-content/uploaded-files/2010/10/Allopathic-Nutrition-vs-Metabolic-Nutrition.pdf

Note: This article was posted here for “preservation” and archival reasons, sometimes you come across information online that you want to make sure others read now and in the future, but the internet world is ever-changing (for whatever reason, something maybe available today and gone tomorrow) thus I sometimes re-post articles like the one here for preservation, I do my best to make it clear that I do not take credit for these articles. I also urge you to visit the website of the author and research the author more to find other materials that she/he has written.

Why Saturated Fat is Good for You

October 24th, 2010 No comments
WHY SATURATED FAT IS GOOD FOR YOU

Although we don’t normally consider saturated fat as an essential nutrient, it is just as essential to good health as the essential polyunsaturated fatty acids. We need saturated fat for proper digestive function, growth, and a host of other processes. In fact, saturated fat is an essential component of every single cell in our bodies. It is so important to proper function and good health that nature has incorporated saturated fat into almost all of the foods we eat both of animal and plant origin. Even the so-called polyunsaturated oils like safflower oil, corn oil, and even flaxseed oil contain saturated fat. The World Health Organization and even the American Heart Association recommends that we get saturated fat in our diet to maintain optimal health. This type of information is usually ignored because saturated fat is considered a health hoodlum lurking in our food just to cause problems, and the less we eat the better. But this is simply not true. Nature doesn’t put saturated fat in vegetables, mother’s milk, and other foods for kicks. It’s there for a reason.

The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO), two international committees, recommend a polyunsaturated to saturated fat ratio (P:S) of 0.6:1.0. Or almost twice as much saturated fat as polyunsaturated fat in the diet. The membrane of our cells preferentially chooses saturated and monounsaturated fat for incorporation into its structure. Only in a few specialized structures are the polyunsaturated fats preferentially selected over saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids.

Saturated fat has been tagged a dietary monster, sneaking into our foods to cause untold health problems. Isn’t it interesting that saturated fat has been a staple part of the human diet for thousands of years and yet only recently has it turned bad, or so they say. In reality, saturated fat isn’t as bad as it has been portrayed; most of this negative publicity is profit motivated.

Cholesterol and saturated fat have been tagged as the biggest dietary villains of all time. Scientists are now discovering that cholesterol is not as bad as it has been made out to be. It is, in fact, vital to good health. Cholesterol is so important to the basic operations of life that without it, every cell in our body would become dead masses of fat and protein. Cholesterol is found in all body tissues and comprises an integral part of the cell membrane. Nine-tenths of all the body’s cholesterol is located in the external and internal membranes of cells. It is essential in the production of nerve and brain tissue. It is used by the body to make bile acids necessary for digestion of fats and fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K). Our bodies transform cholesterol into a variety of important hormones such as estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, DHEA, cortisol, and others. Simply put, without cholesterol we would be dead.

As knowledge of dietary cholesterol has increased, its status as a troublemaker has fallen. As a result, more heat has been placed on saturated fat, which is now considered a much more serious problem. According to the cholesterol theory, coronary artery disease is caused by cholesterol buildup in arteries, so why is saturated fat condemned? Saturated fat is attacked because our bodies can turn it into cholesterol. We get more cholesterol from saturated fat than we do from the cholesterol in our food. But this native cholesterol, which is made by our liver, is the naterial used to build healthy cells and is not the “oxidized” or damaged cholesterol that finds its way inside artery walls. So eating saturated fat contributes little, if anything, to the development of atherosclerosis and heart disease. Since ordinary cholesterol is not a factor in the development of heart disease, saturated fat, likewise, is not the problem it is made out to be.

History has proven this fact. Our ancestors lived on a diet rich in grease, lard, and butter. Those were the only oils they ever used. It wasn’t until the 20th century that vegetable oils became widely available. Use of oils rich in saturated fat have declined over time while vegetable oils have skyrocketed. Along with the greater use of vegetable oil and the decreased use of saturated fat has come a plague of degenerative diseases that the world has never known before. To blame cholesterol and saturated fat for the heart disease, cancer, and other degenerative diseases does not fit the facts and is inconsistent with the historical record.

There have been many studies that demonstrate that saturated fat is not nearly as bad as it has been made out to be. If saturated fat consumption caused heart disease then eliminating it from the diet would prevent the illness. The Lancet reported a study of 2,000 men who went on a low saturated fat diet to see how that would affect cardiovascular health. The study found that those participants who went on diets low in saturated fat didn’t experience any reduction in heart attack death risk over a two year period. If eliminating saturated fat didn’t stop heart disease from developing, it is logical to assume there is another cause.

Researchers have shown in animal studies that saturated fatty acids actually help to prevent stroke rather than cause it. In particular, Dr. Yamori reported decreased stroke incidence among rats fed a high-fat, high cholesterol diet. In addition, Dr. Ikeda demonstrated a dcreased stroke risk among rats fed a diet high in milk fat.

Two ecological studies in the 1980s from Japan found correlations between increased fat intake and decreased death from ischemic stroke in humans. In another cohort study of Japanese men living in Hawaii, intake of both total fat and saturated fat was inversely associated with all stroke mortality, after adjustment for multiple risk factors. These studies were generally ignored because they were contrary to the prevailing belief that saturated fat promotes ischemic stroke rather than protects us from it.

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