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Allopathic Nutrition vs. Metabolic Nutrition

October 26th, 2010 No comments

Here’s a document I wanted to share, it’s titled Allopathic Nutrition vs. Metabolic Nutrition (by Harold J. Kristal, article from the Townsend Report) discussed metabolic typing, blood pH, and explains what allopathic nutrition is.

Quote:

Most nutritionists today practice allopathic nutrition. I will describe a few examples. Calcium is usually prescribed to individuals with osteoporosis. Niacin is often prescribed for high cholesterol or poor circulation. Vitamin B-6 is frequently prescribed for circulatory disorders. In each case, a nutrient is utilized as a “universal” treatment for a given condition. These various supplements are prescribed to treat the disorders often with total disregard for the unique qualities that make up each individual’s metabolism.

This is an allopathic approach to nutrition. What is so confusing and confounding about nutrition today is that many people are helped by these protocols and many are not helped. Some, perhaps, are made worse. Why is this? Today I begin to understand why. The late Dr. Roger J. Williams, noted biochemist from the University of Texas and discoverer of pantothenic acid, stated that we are all biochemically unique. I now understand that these biochemical differences define an individual’s Metabolic Type. My experience has lead me to believe that it is the difference between Metabolic Types that is responsible for the actuality that, when it comes to nutrition, what makes one person better can actually make someone else with the same condition worse.
Understanding the following premises and facts offers a simplistic basis for this idea:

1. Ideal venous blood pH reflects the biochemical balance and metabolic efficiency in the fundamental homeostatic control mechanisms. The ideal venous pH is 7.46. Below this figure is acid, above this figure is alkaline. If one’s blood pH were to be in the proximity of ideal, then optimum absorption and utilization of micro and macro-nutrients will take place. The further one’s pH deviates from the ideal, the less efficient will be the absorption and utilization of these nutrients. This is when allergies, fatigue, digestive disorders, and a multitude of other disease conditions can occur.
2. Metabolism can be defined as the total life-supporting chemical and electrical reactions that take place in a cell or organism. The rate of oxidation and the affect of the autonomic nervous system are, I believe, two fundamental homeostatic control mechanisms that define Metabolic Types.
3. The Oxidative types relate to the oxidation rate-the speed at which the intracellular conversion of nutrients to energy occurs. The three classifications derived from the oxidation rate are the Fast Oxidizers (acid blood pH), Slow Oxidizers (alkaline blood pH), and mixed oxidizers.
4. The Autonomic types relate to the two divisions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), the master regulator of metabolism. The three classifications derived from the ANS are the Sympathetic, Parasympathetic, and the Balanced types.
5. Most individuals are dominant in one of five metabolic categories:
a) Fast Oxidizer
b) Slow Oxidizer
c) Balanced (Autonomic)/Mixed (Oxidative)
d) Sympathetic and
e) Parasympathetic.

Keep in mind that acid or alkaline blood pH can be due to either the influence of the oxidative system OR the autonomic system. The significant difference between these two systems is that most foods and most nutrients that acidify the Oxidative types actually alkalize the autonomic types, and foods and nutrients that alkalize the oxidative types acidify the Autonomic types!

This phenomenon is scientifically and factually proven. It is not theory, but fact. It was first observed by W.L. Wolcott of Healthexcel in 1983 and formulated into his principle called The Dominance Factor.1 This essentially states that the effect of any food or nutrient on biochemistry is not due to an inherent quality of that substance, but rather to the Dominant fundamental control system, e.g., Autonomic or Oxidative, being affected in the person’s biochemistry. This explains why a given nutrient can have different effects in different people. This also explains why what works for one person with a given condition may not work for another person with the same condition.

Because any nutrient can be acidifying or alkalizing, stimulatory or inhibitory, depending upon one’s Metabolic Type, when health practitioners use nutrition to address disease states in humans without taking into consideration their Metabolic Type, it is an allopathic approach. The success or failure of the treatment is hit-or-miss, a matter of chance and not predictability.

Download this document using this link http://www.seekingwholeness.com/wp-content/uploaded-files/2010/10/Allopathic-Nutrition-vs-Metabolic-Nutrition.pdf

Note: This article was posted here for “preservation” and archival reasons, sometimes you come across information online that you want to make sure others read now and in the future, but the internet world is ever-changing (for whatever reason, something maybe available today and gone tomorrow) thus I sometimes re-post articles like the one here for preservation, I do my best to make it clear that I do not take credit for these articles. I also urge you to visit the website of the author and research the author more to find other materials that she/he has written.