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Be Your Own Best Friend

August 3rd, 2010 1 comment

girl5-stick-figure

We have to learn to be our own best friends because we fall too easily into the trap of being our own worst enemies.

~Roderick Thorp, Rainbow Drive

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Who’s Roderick Thorp? What’s Rainbow Drive? I dunno. (Maybe you do? Clue me in if you feel like doing so.) Call me ignorant. And INSPIRED! Cuz this quote is loaded- with the key to your life being much, much easier.

Be easier on yourself.

We are programmed and bombarded daily with negative images, “news”, and feedback about ourselves. So it’s no wonder we run loops of negative self-talk over and over, throughout the day, most of which, is unconscious. Until it’s not.

CATCH YOURSELF- notice when you are saying something negative about either yourSELF or about your LIFE and say “stop”. If you want to add some extra breaking-power, use an EFT/Tapping technique, where you take your index and middle finger, and tap just below your eye, on the top edge of your cheekbone, and say “I release this thought about myself. I completely accept myself, just as I am. All is well.” Then take a few deep breaths and just relax.

You are gonna have to live with yourself for the REST of your life, so you might as well become the best of friends with your own worthy self. If you think you are boring, mean, or not a good friend to others, then start by being open to feeling more excited, kind, and a good friend to yourself. Remind yourself throughout the day that YOU CAN DEPEND on you.

We are here on Earth to be in relationship to other people- to receive help, guidance, love, and companionship from others. This is a huge playing field in which we learn to expand ourselves into grander versions of ourselves. But you can also expand yourself ALL ON YOUR OWN! And you do that by FEELING GOOD.

So start feeling better- about yourself and your capacity to handle WHATEVER life brings your way. Feel better about your ability to be loving, and helpful- seek opportunities to do so, so you can be amazed by your experiences. Feel better about your life, no matter WHAT is going on (or NOT going on), but tapping that point below your eye and affirming that life can get better, and you are learning to be your “bestest” friend in the WHOLE WIDE WORLD.

Then others will do the same. And you don’t even have to “try”- you don’t have to convince them of anything, or say or do anything to help them change. It will be AUTOMATIC. People may start to watch you, look at you, and wonder “what is WITH you?” and you may reply by saying “myself. I am with me. I’m the best thing that’s ever happened to me.” And you’re here to ROCK the world! To shake it back awake- Our brothers and sisters are in need of love and this gentle reminder. Let yourself remember just how amazing you are.

I love you!

Summer, The (Lawn Chemicals) Allergy Season

April 19th, 2010 No comments


sneeze2Many may sneeze here and there during the spring and summer seasons due to pollen, dust, and other particles in the air. Sneezing is our body’s natural response for protecting itself against harmful particles in the air. Most blame the plants and nature on their allergic reaction. In this article I hope to share one often overlooked allergen, that is not only sneeze-inducing but also potentially hazardous to health.

I am sensitive to the smell of chemicals, especially those sprayed on yards and lawns. When I visit a home improvement store, I literally cannot walk down the isle where pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers are shelved. If I find myself in close proximity, the smell disgusts me and can even make me feel sick, not to mention I start to sneeze.

The harmful and annoying effects of these chemicals seems to often be missing in the mainstream awareness. I rarely hear talk about lawn chemicals and that throat burning chemical smell unique to these chemicals, how they are over used, abused, and often confused with the notion of a healthy lawn.

As I drove to work this morning, I could see chemical spraying vehicles from a local company proudly proclaiming “true green”. A sobering and sad reminder that summer is here. Don’t get me wrong, I adore summer. I loath the chemicals used in the summer.

I got to work, parked my car next to a lawn that was reeking with the chemical smell. As I exited my vehicle heading to my work place I sneezed.

Everybody wants that truly green lawn, right? Wrong, I don’t. I never use chemicals on my lawn, it is not the greenest, nor the prettiest, but that is not my concern. I value safety and doing no harm to others and nature more than a green lawn. My lawn is not polluting your air, making you sneeze or poisoning your air.

When you use chemicals on your lawn here is what you are doing: You are paying factories to make synthetic poisonous chemicals, tons and tons of them (due to consumer demand). You then pay them to package these in plastic containers (plastic waste), ship them all over the US (green house gases due to transportation). You follow that by doing your consumer duty, you grab the chemicals and spray them over your land. If you want better results, you pay a little more, and you get a vehicles assuring you “true green lawns”, this vehicles is one super pray bottle, it is filled with chemicals that should they be dumped in a pond would kill all the fish. You watch as they proudly spray that poison over your grass, you think it’s a small price to pay for the result, my beautiful green lawn is just around the corner. You also may believe the lie that your grass is safe to touch, lay down on, walk barefoot on, within 3 days or a week.

Once these chemicals have been manufactured in the factory (thanks to consumer demand) they are here to stay. When these are sprayed on your grass, so much of this chemical vapor goes into the air, on your trees, on your house siding, into your windows; the air blows this chemical residue on to your neighbors property, onto their vegetable garden, and into their open windows. The chemicals on the grass or in the soil don’t stay there either; sooner or later rain will push these chemicals down into the soil and eventually into ground water, it will pollute the soil for many years and ground water for decades. If you live close to a lake or marsh rain will wash off the chemicals into the lakes drastically effecting the ecosystem, killing fish increasing algae and effecting those who eat the fish and swim in the lake.

One often missed point, is that once you cut the grass, as the mower chops the glass and shakes it violently, these chemicals are released into the air again. Ultimately, the use of these chemicals and the impact they have on nature contributes to weakening people’s immune systems and causing cancer.

If you have children, seriously reconsider chemicals in your yard and lawn. Grass is very attractive, don’t turn it into a poisonous trap for your kids.

Respect your neighbors, you most likely do not throw trash into your neighbors house, yet you are ‘ok’ allowing the release of poison into the air that gets, not only inside your house but, into your neighbors house. If your neighbor is me, you may hear me sneezing as I smell this nasty chemical odor.

In the past I used to curse at these lawns when I sneezed, rather than thinking or expecting a ‘bless you’ I’d utter a curse. I’d blame the lawn, the property owner or ignorance. Today as the summer nears and the chemicals are again unleashed, I sneezed, I did not curse this time; I said “bless you” to the lawn.

Read more…

Eye-Relaxing Breathing Technique

September 25th, 2009 1 comment

Title: Breathing
by William H. Bates, M.D.

MANY patients with imperfect sight are benefited by breathing. One of the best methods is to separate the teeth while keeping the lips closed, breathe deeply as though one were yawning. When done properly one can feel the air cold as it passes through the nose and down the throat. This method of breathing secures a great amount of relaxation of the nose, throat, the body generally including the eyes and ears.

A man aged sixty-five, had imperfect sight for distance and was unable to read fine print without the aid of strong glasses. After practicing deep breathing in the manner described he became able at once to, read diamond type quite perfectly, as close as six inches from the eyes. The benefit was temporary but by repetition the improvement became more permanent.

At one time I experimented with a number of patients, first having them hold their breath and test their vision, which was usually lower when they did not breathe. They became able to demonstrate that holding their breath was a strain and caused imperfect sight, double vision, dizziness and fatigue, while the deep breathing at once gave them relief.

There is a wrong way of breathing in which when the air is drawn into the lungs the nostrils contract. This is quite conspicuous among many cases of tuberculosis.

Some teachers of physical culture in their classes while encouraging deep breathing close their nostrils when drawing in a long breath. This is wrong because it produces a strain and imperfect sight. By consciously doing the wrong thing, breathing with a strain one becomes better able to practice the right way and obtain relaxation and better sight.

The habit of practicing frequently deep breathing one obtains a more permanent relaxation of the eyes with more constant good vision.

Studies On The Effects Of Respiration & Breathing

January 4th, 2009 No comments

Thanks to Wholeness Forums member tscherz’s contribution found here I now have found 13 additional studies, in addition to the three studies I blogged about earlier, on the effects of breathing. Here they are:

1. Duranti, R., Sanna, I. Romagnoli, M. Nerini, F. Gigliotti, N. Ambrosino, G. Scano. “Walking modality affects respiratory muscle action and contribution to respiratory effort.” Pflugers Arch. 2004 May; 448 (2): 222-30.

2. Grimstone, S.K., P.W. Hodges, “Impaired postural compensation for respiration in people with recurrent low back pain.” Exp Brain Res. 2003 Jul; 151 (2): 218-24. Epub 2003 May 21.

3. Hamaoui, A., M. Do, L. Poupard, S. Bouisset. “Does respiration perturb body balance more in chronic low back pain subjects than in healthy subjects?” Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 2002 Aug; 17 (7): 548-50.

4. Kondo, T., I. Kobayashi, Y. Taguchi, Y. Ohta, N. Yanagimachi, “A dynamic analysis of chest wall motions with MRI in healthy young subjects.” Respirology. 2000 Mar; 5 (1): 19-25.

5. Kondo, T., I. Kobayashi, Y. Taguchi, N. Hayama, S. Tajiri, N. Yanagimachi, “An analysis of the chest wall motions usinsg the dynamic MRI in healthy elder subjects.” Tokai J Exp Clin Med. 2005 Apr; 30 (1): 15-20.

6. Mehling, W.E. , K.A. Hamel, M. Acree, N. Byl, F.M. Hecht. “Randomized, controlled trial of breath therapy for patients with chronic low-back pain.” Altern Ther Health Med. 2005 Jul-Aug; 11 (4): 44-52.

7. Mitchell, G.S., S.M. Johnson. “Neuroplasticity in respiratory motor control.” J Apply Phisiol. 2003 Jan, 94 (1) : 358-74.

8. Romagnoli, I., B. Lanini, R. Bianchi, N. Soldani, M. Nerini, R. Duranti, G. Scano. “Chest wall kinematics and respiratory muscle coordinated action during hypercapnia in healthy males,” Eur J Appl Physiol. 2004 May, 91 (5-6): 525-33. Epub 2004 Jan 21.

9. Sanna, A., F. Bertoli, G. Misuri, F. Gigliotti, I. Iandelli, M. Mancini, R. Duranti, N. Amborsino, G. Scano. “Chest wall kinematics and respiratory muscle action in walking healthy humans.” J Appl Physiol. 1999 Sep; 87 (3): 938-46.

10. Smith, M,, M.W. Coppieters, P.W. Hodges, “Effect of experimentally induced low back pain on postural sway with breathing.” Exp Brain Res. 2005 Sep, 166 (1): 109-17. 2005 Jul 20.

11. Van Dixhorn, J. “Functional breathing is ‘Whole body Breathing’.” Biological Psychology, 1997; 46: 89-90.

12. Van Dixhorn, J. “Body awareness and Self-Regulation”, in: Y. Haruki, K.T. Kaku, eds. Meditation as healthy promotion: a lifestyle modification approach. 2000; 65-80, Eburon Publishers, Delft, The Netherlands.

13. Wittenboer G. et. al. “Respiratory variability and psychological well-being in schoolchildren.” Behavior Modification, 2003, 653-670.

Learn Full Yogic Breathing

October 28th, 2008 No comments

This article shows you in simple words how to practice yogic breathing (or yoga breathing).

Full yoga breathing combines both yoga chest (thoracic) breathing and yoga abdominal breathing.

Get Ready

  • Wear something comfortable, nothing tight or restrictive. Take off your shows and socks
  • Lay down on your back, sit in a meditative posture, or a relaxed posture
  • Be relaxed
  • Hands and legs outstretched (alternatively with both hands on your abdomen)
  • First start with your eyes looking up at the ceiling
  • Gently close your eyes and relax more

Start:

Read more…

Thoracic (Chest) Breathing

October 12th, 2008 No comments

This article shows you in simple words how to practice thoracic or chest breathing.

Get Ready

  • Wear something comfortable, nothing tight or restrictive. Take off your shows and socks
  • Lay down on your back, sit in a meditative posture, or a relaxed posture
  • Be relaxed
  • Hands and legs outstretched (alternatively with both hands on your abdomen)
  • First start with your eyes looking up at the ceiling
  • Gently close your eyes and relax more

Start:

Read more…

Abdominal Breathing

October 12th, 2008 No comments

This article shows you in simple words how to practice abdominal breathing.

Get Ready

  • Wear something comfortable, nothing tight or restrictive. Take off your shows and socks
  • Lay down on your back, sit in a meditative posture, or a relaxed posture
  • Be relaxed
  • Hands and legs outstretched (alternatively with both hands on your abdomen)
  • First start with your eyes looking up at the ceiling
  • Gently close your eyes and relax more

Start:

Read more…

Forced Unilateral Nostril Breathing – Affects Both Brain Hemisphericity and Autonomic Activity

October 11th, 2008 No comments

This study concerns the effects of forced unilateral nostril breathing on brain hemisphere stimulation and autonomic activity

TITLE:

Changes in intraocular pressure induced by differential forced unilateral nostril breathing, a technique that affects both brain hemisphericity and autonomic activity

Joshua Backon, Nelson Matamoros and Uriel Ticho
Journal Graefe’s Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology

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Selective Hemispheric Stimulation by Unilateral Forced Nostril Breathing

October 9th, 2008 No comments

This study concerns the effects of forced nostril breathing on selective hemispheric stimulation.

TITLE:

Selective Hemispheric Stimulation by Unilateral Forced Nostril Breathing
By Werntz DA, Bickford RG, Shannahoff-Khalsa D.

Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, La Jolla 92093.
Published in Human Neurobiology (1987) 6(3):165-171

INTRO:

This paper shows that forced nostril breathing in one nostril produces a relative increase in the EEG amplitude in the contralateral hemisphere. This phenomena was demonstrated in 5 out of 5 untrained subjects. These results suggest the possibility of a non-invasive approach in the treatment of states of psychopathology where lateralized cerebral dysfunction have been shown to occur.

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Effect of Short-Term Practice of Breathing Exercises on Autonomic Functions in Normal Human Volunteers

October 8th, 2008 No comments

This research concerns slow breathing exercises and their effects on the autonomic function and the sympathetic or parasympathetic activity.

TITLE:

Effect of Short-Term Practice of Breathing Exercises on Autonomic Functions in Normal Human Volunteers

By Pal G.K, Velkumary S, Madanmohan – Published in the Indian Journal of Medical Research, Aug 2004

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES:

Practice of breathing exercises like pranayama is known to improve autonomic function by changing sympathetic or parasympathetic activity. Therefore, in the present study the effect of breathing exercises on autonomic functions was performed in young volunteers in the age group of 17-19 yr.

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Controlling the Movement of PEC and the Sternum

September 27th, 2008 No comments

It is possible through breathing exercises and awareness to control the respiratory pattern of the PEC muscle.

Most people breath too quickly and not deeply enough, others who breath deep into the abdomen are not getting enough air to the upper lungs. I’m the later. At my last physical therapy meetings, the physical therapist said I should breath to the sides of my lungs instead of breathing deep into my abdomen.

With a little concentration it is possible to fill your lungs, feel the sides expand outwards, while not pushing the sternum outwards as the lungs fill.

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Tingling Goosebumps Equals Life Energy

September 22nd, 2008 105 comments

What is that tingling, electric, goosebumps-y sensation that some experience?

In this blog entry I talk about my experience with this sensation. This is not a new sensation but I recently experienced it in abundance.

Throughout my life I had felt tingling waves that went inside of my body and spread on the surface of my skin while meditating or praying, especially when in deep relaxation or concentration. When this sensation is on the surface it is accompanied by goose bumps that swarm the skin and traverse the body in waves. When inside the body, this sensation is like a cloud of charged tingling particles. I found it possible to direct this cloud of sensation with concentration. Does this sound familiar?

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